Blockchain and Masters Degree in Malta

Malta, the “Blockchain Island” in the Mediterranean, has government authority to certify distributed ledger platforms, smart contract management regulations and a framework for the launch of ICOs

Approximately 35 students enrolled in the only DLT program in the island country, one of the few in the world.


It is the latest charge of embracing the island of Malta on almost everything, an effort now in its second year.

When Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, in April 2017, unveiled plans for Malta to become a “global leader” in blockchain technology.

It was in stark contrast to the reactions of most of the world’s governments to DLT, many of which were lagging – then as now – in how to proceed.

But the Maltese moved quickly. Lawmakers began to issue block-friendly laws and prominent industry players – including Binance.

The world’s largest cryptographic exchange by volume, OKEx announced – it will move to the island.

In less than a year, the plan paid dividends. Cryptocurrency companies were coming ashore and more companies were on the way.

Joshua Elul, director of the Master’s program, who also heads the Malta Digital Innovation Authority, told CoinDesk that in addition to 15 companies who have already reached DLT students.

Blockchain contracts, projects and initiatives run by the government are in high demand.

Lots of jobs – all looking for highly trained and fluent blockchain applicants

“This year, you are here,” Ellul told a crowd of students at the annual DELTA summit in Malta, where the DLT Masters program at the University of Malta began on October 3.

“Future Blockchain and DLT specialists – who will drive and drive Blockchain Island.”

Last year the Maltese government granted 300,000 euros to fund scholarships for the program. She also had a hand in her development, Ellul said.

The course trains students on blockchain law, regulation, business and finance, and ICT.

Students continue to focus their focus on three full semesters while identifying the other two fields.

He told Ellul CoinDesk that this academic diversity prioritizes a broad base of knowledge.

He said that Blockchain professionals are industry experts, but few can tie other threads together.

blockchain smart contract Island
blockchain smart contract

Programmers knew little about legal issues; lawyers knew little about launching a business. Entrepreneurs just didn’t know how to code.

“We have noticed a big problem between technicians, lawyers and business professionals,” Elul said.

“There was a connection between us.”

This gave him an idea:

“We thought:” This would be the perfect place to get a master’s degree, which serves multidisciplinary purposes for different disciplines. “

The program was developed by Ellul and Gordon Pace, a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Malta and a member of the Distributed Ledger Technologies Center, headed by Ellul.

It has become a proven base and idea in the development of masters where faculty from all over the university have given their view on what should be included.

Pace told CoinDesk that he traveled across Europe to speak to field experts:

“We had a sense of what they needed, the kind of experts they needed.”

Pace said:

“From the beginning the idea was to have a broad and deep program.”

The Master’s program now gives students a comprehensive framework in their targeted discipline with a range of useful tools if they are very specific in other blockchain fields.

Pace, who spent most of his career working on software assurance techniques before entering an academy for digitized coins, will study smart contracts.

Delivering lectures to students from all backgrounds on smart contracts, a technological development that he described as a “time bomb waiting to explode” in value.

In December, he will start teaching lawyers and entrepreneurs how to program smart contracts.

“I hope their reaction is not the same as yours,”

Pace told this reporter, who has tried and failed to learn coding languages in the past.

But bridging the gap in specialization is one of Bass’s favorite academic endeavors.

He said that although the program might create contract teachers for ICT course students.

However, it will also improve the knowledge of less technical students who are required to attend the course.

“I think the idea of becoming literate in technology more than masters is the key.”

Students who do not speak ICT and who spoke to CoinDesk agree with this article.

Jessica Borg, a graduate of law and business programs at the University of Malta.

who has returned to part-time study in organizing templates, will join the next semester.

Borg is director of corporate financial services at Grant Thornton Malta, where she said she saw the effect of government smearing of blockchain companies.

“We have seen a lot of size and a lot of attention”

In companies seeking to take advantage of the regulatory landscape of Malta. Borg said. That’s why I enrolled in the course:

“I thought this was immediately the next step in my organizational development.”

Ellul, program manager, acknowledged that it may be difficult to design and launch a master’s program for a rapidly evolving field, in business practices, organization and technology.

What students learn in one year may quickly move to irrelevant the following year.

But then again, every technically-minded program faces this challenge, and Ilul said that the University of Malta will change over time to address today’s problems.

He is more interested in the level of interdisciplinary student that the program may one day make.

“Over time, perhaps, we should start thinking about training a mixed programmer’s lawyer:

Lecturer in law or let’s say a lawyer for the law, “

According to Cindesk


Learn more:
Marowa Al Tujjar
Marowa Al Tujjar
مديرة القسم الصحفي - كاتبة و محررة إقتصادية متخصصة بالعملات الرقمية
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